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At Ashford University, we realize that the hiring process is an investment of your time and energy. That's why we put special emphasis on making your experience a great one. Taking a page from our core values at Bridgepoint Education, which begin with ethics, accountability and integrity, you can count on us to treat you with the same consideration we would treat any of our valued team members. We hope you'll explore the many great job opportunities available at Ashford University starting today!
       
     
3 Steps to an Ashford University Career
1. Apply Today!

Applying to Ashford University is easy. Ashford University’s online system allows you to view and apply to featured jobs and to upload and update your résumé. Apply to open opportunities to get started.

 
2. Partner with a Human Resources Recruiter
Ashford University’s recruitment process is dynamic, tailored specifically to each candidate as you enter the hiring process. Once you have applied to an open position and been selected to start the interview process, you will have the opportunity to work directly with a Human Resources Recruiter dedicated to hiring right!
 
3. Interview with Ashford University
Once you've established a relationship with one of our Human Resources Recruiters, you can count on them as a partner to guide you through the entire interview process. Working directly with your Recruiter, you'll have the opportunity to explore multiple positions simultaneously, and to receive added exposure to different departments and hiring leaders.
 
By Peter Vogt, Monster Senior Contributing Writer

It's deceptively easy to make mistakes on your resume and exceptionally difficult to repair the damage once an employer gets it. So prevention is critical, especially if you've never written one before. Check out this resume guide to the most common pitfalls and how you can avoid them.
 
1. Typos and Grammatical Errors
Your resume needs to be grammatically perfect. If it isn't, employers will read between the lines and draw not-so-flattering conclusions about you, like: "This person can't write," or "This person obviously doesn't care."
 
2. Lack of Specifics
Employers need to understand what you've done and accomplished. For example:
A. Worked with employees in a restaurant setting.
B. Recruited, hired, trained and supervised more than 20 employees in a restaurant with $2 million in annual sales.
Both of these phrases could describe the same person, but the details and specifics in example B will more likely grab an employer's attention.
 
3. Attempting One Size Fits All
Whenever you try to develop a one-size-fits-all resume to send to all employers, you almost always end up with something employers will toss in the recycle bin. Employers want you to write a resume specifically for them. They expect you to clearly show how and why you fit the position in a specific organization.
 
4. Highlighting Duties Instead of Accomplishments
It's easy to slip into a mode where you simply start listing job duties on your resume. For example:
Attended group meetings and recorded minutes.
Worked with children in a day-care setting.
Updated departmental files.
Employers, however, don't care so much about what you've done as what you've accomplished in your various activities. They're looking for statements more like these:
Used laptop computer to record weekly meeting minutes and compiled them in a Microsoft Word-based file for future organizational reference.
Developed three daily activities for preschool-age children and prepared them for a 10-minute holiday program performance.
Reorganized 10 years worth of unwieldy files, making them easily accessible to department members.
 

5. Going on Too Long or Cutting Things Too Short
Despite what you may read or hear, there are no real rules governing the length of your resume. Why? Because human beings, who have different preferences and expectations where resumes are concerned, will be reading it.

 
That doesn't mean you should start sending out five-page resumes, of course. Generally speaking, you usually need to limit yourself to a maximum of two pages. But don't feel you have to use two pages if one will do. Conversely, don't cut the meat out of your resume simply to make it conform to an arbitrary one-page standard.
 
6. A Bad Objective
Employers do read your resume's objective statement, but too often they plow through vague pufferies like, "Seeking a challenging position that offers professional growth." Give employers something specific and, more importantly, something that focuses on their needs as well as your own. Example: "A challenging entry-level marketing position that allows me to contribute my skills and experience in fund-raising for nonprofits."
 
7. No Action Verbs
Avoid using phrases like "responsible for." Instead, use action verbs: "Resolved user questions as part of an IT help desk serving 4,000 students and staff."
 
8. Leaving Off Important Information
You may be tempted, for example, to eliminate mention of the jobs you've taken to earn extra money for school. Typically, however, the soft skills you've gained from these experiences (e.g., work ethic, time management) are more important to employers than you might think.
 
9. Visually Too Busy
If your resume is wall-to-wall text featuring five different fonts, it will most likely give the employer a headache. So show your resume to several other people before sending it out. Do they find it visually attractive? If what you have is hard on the eyes, revise.
 
10. Incorrect Contact Information
I once worked with a student whose resume seemed incredibly strong, but he wasn't getting any bites from employers. So one day, I jokingly asked him if the phone number he'd listed on his resume was correct. It wasn't. Once he changed it, he started getting the calls he'd been expecting. Moral of the story: Double-check even the most minute, taken-for-granted details -- sooner rather than later.
 
 
 
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Ashford University (headquarters)
  8620 Spectrum Center Blvd.
  San Diego CA 92123
   
     
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